Agile working for organisations that need to get up to speed quickly

The aspiration is there in many organisations, the reality is, however, not all are ready. And with large numbers of people now working from home, many will need to develop an agile working approach in a ‘test and learn’ virtual environment.

Whilst we can wax lyrical about the benefits, this is not the time. Homeworking, during the current crisis, is not a choice, it is a necessity to keep communities safe and well. So, as an employer, what are your obligations and what do you need to consider?

‘Agile working is about bringing people, processes, connectivity and technology, time and place together to find the most appropriate and effective way of working to carry out a particular task. It is working within guidelines (of the task) but without boundaries (of how you achieve it).’

Paul Allsopp

Founder of The Agile Organisation

Practical resources

Download our practical guide to homeworking here

Communication and engagement are key. Don’t make assumptions about what your people need – ask them. Use this template to check in with them regularly

High Speed Training have developed a useful Risk Assessment template that’s ready to adapt and use. To view and download it, click here

Your questions answered

We’ll be updating this page regularly as new questions come in. If you have a specific query you want answered, use the contact form here

We’ve enforced a working from home policy and some employees don’t agree, what do I do?

As a business we do not have enough laptops to enable all our employees to work from home, neither do we have the financial means or time to provide everyone with one. If employees are not able to attend the office, what does that mean for our business?

We’ve enforced a working from home policy and some employees don’t agree, what do I do?

Generally, this would be regarded as a lawful instruction on the part of the employer – especially as these are government guidelines and not necessarily employer choice. This should, therefore, not give rise to any problems, even if there is no specific provision in an employee’s contract of employment to allow for this. However, if an employee does raise concerns about working from home, then you will need to listen to what they say and seek to address their concerns. If their concerns are justified, then consider what alternative arrangements might be feasible. Please remember that as an employer you are still responsible for an employee’s health and safety when working from home and you will also need to consider how you will communicate and engage with your employees during this time.

As a business we do not have enough laptops to enable all our employees to work from home, neither do we have the financial means or time to provide everyone with one. If employees are not able to attend the office, what does that mean for our business?

Obviously, people can only work from home if they have the capability to do so. If that capability isn’t there, then they cannot. If that is the case, you may wish to explore options outlined above such as employees taking annual leave or agreeing to a temporary reduction in hours (as a more palatable option to redundancy). Please seek advice from an HR professional if you are considering the latter as an option.

Talk to us

If you’d prefer to speak with someone about a specific issue directly, then please call.

For operational HR Advice, call

Victoria Beadle: 07988 276402
victoria@seymourjohn.com

 

For strategic leadership support, call

Philippa Richards: 07732 068624
philippa@seymourjohn.com
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